A Sport for Everyone? Inclusion and Exclusion in the Organisation of the First Olympic Modern Pentathlon - Archive ouverte HAL Access content directly
Journal Articles The International Journal of the History of Sport Year : 2014

A Sport for Everyone? Inclusion and Exclusion in the Organisation of the First Olympic Modern Pentathlon

(1)
1

Abstract

The Olympic Games in Stockholm, 1912, were the first taking place without connection to a world exhibition. Thus, the sports competitions took centre stage. The modern pentathlon was new in the programme. Though the sport met Pierre de Coubertin's ideological support and Viktor Balck's encouragement, its staging caused more problems than the organising committee originally expected: as hardly any pre-experiences with this competition existed, debates were frequent and agreements not always easily achieved. One of the greatest problem was related to the allowance of participants without own horse. Still 1 week before the competition started, the question of loan horses remained unsolved. At the same time, a woman's participation request troubled the organisers.This research aims at exploring the work of the organising committee when planning and implementing the first Olympic modern pentathlon in 1912. It focuses on two aspects which best reflect the power relations in society at that time and thereby provide insights into the strength of socially conditioned images of class and gender orders at the beginning of the twentieth century. The research is mainly based on an analysis of historical material from the Archives of the International Olympic Committee (IOC) in Lausanne and from the National Archives in Stockholm.
Not file

Dates and versions

hal-02336756 , version 1 (29-10-2019)

Identifiers

Cite

Sandra Heck. A Sport for Everyone? Inclusion and Exclusion in the Organisation of the First Olympic Modern Pentathlon. The International Journal of the History of Sport, 2014, 31 (5), pp.526-541. ⟨10.1080/09523367.2013.798305⟩. ⟨hal-02336756⟩
29 View
0 Download

Altmetric

Share

Gmail Facebook Twitter LinkedIn More